Ceremony Styles & Music

1. The Traditional Ceremony

Order of Service

Processional

Invocation

Welcome and Greeting

Question to the Couple

Scripture Reading

Minister’s Remarks (Homily)

Declaration of Intention

Vows

Song

Exchange of Rings

Prayer of Dedication

Unity Candle Ritual

Declaration of Marriage

Benediction

Embrace and Kiss

Introduction of the Couple

Recessional

The Ceremony

When the minister and attendants are in place, the congregation rises and the bride proceeds to the front, accompanied by her father or other escort. They stop before the minister.

Invocation

The minister says: Let us pray: O God, we thank you for your presence among us on this joyous occasion. As N. and N. give themselves to each other, we pray that they might also give themselves to you, offering their shared life in service to your will. In the quietness of these sacred moments, we remember that you planted the seeds of love in the human heart. Now, as N., and N., stand before you and their friends, we affirm the love that has brought them together. Amen.

Welcome and Greeting

The congregation sits. The minister says: We are gathered here to unite N. and N. in marriage. Marriage is an honorable institution ordained by the church, blessed by Jesus with his presence at the marriage at Cana in Galilee, and perpetuated by faithful and honorable men and women throughout the ages. This simple ceremony, this celebration, is the outward token of a sacred and inward union of hearts, a union created by God’s loving purpose and kept by God’s abiding will.

N. and N., we have joined to help you give added life to this marriage that you have chosen. Nothing is greater for two human souls than to feel they are joined together in the presence of their Creator to strengthen each other in all gladness, to be one with each other in the silent, unspeakable memories of the heart, and to let their happiness lead them into decisions and deeds that contribute to the lives of others and to the betterment of our world.

(To the congregation:) N. and N. welcome you, their families and friends. Each of you has given some of yourself into their lives. They want you to know that your love, guidance and encouragement will forever be appreciated. It is fitting, then, that you should share this celebration of their commitment to each other.

N. and N., it is in this spirit you two have come to be married.

Question to the Couple

The minister says: Who gives this woman to be married to this man?

The respondent says: I do, or We do, or Her family and I.

The groom steps to the bride’s side. The father or escort is seated.

Scripture Reading

The minister says: The Old Testament reading is from Genesis 2:18-24: Then the LORD God said, “It is not good that the man should be alone; I will make him a helper as his partner.” So out of the ground the LORD God formed every animal of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to the man to see what he would call them; and whatever the man called every living creature, that was its name. The man gave names to all cattle, and to the birds of the air, and to every animal of the field; but for the man there was not found a helper as his partner. So the LORD God caused a deep sleep to fall upon the man, and he slept; then he took one of his ribs and closed up its place with flesh. And the rib that the LORD God had taken from the man he made into a woman and brought her to the man. Then the man said, “This at last is bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh; this one shall be called Woman, for out of Man this one was taken.” Therefore a man leaves his father and his mother and clings to his wife, and they become one flesh.-25, 28, 31-33: And live in love, as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us, a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God …. Be subject to one another out of reverence for Christ.-you notes — if you don’t lose the card that comes with each particular gift!– 1662 Book of Common Prayer

The minister says: Let us pray. Bless, O God, the giving of this ring, that he who gives it and she who wears it live in love and fidelity, and continue in your service all the days of their lives, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Prayer of Dedication

The couple may kneel or remain standing. The minister says: Let us pray. Our loving God, Creator and Preserver of us all, bless N., that he might share his love, strength and protection with N., so that she might find in him character, patience, understanding and faithfulness. Bless N. with tenderness and an inner beauty of soul that never fades and a holding fast to those Godlike qualities which make marriage right and beautiful. Teach them, Lord, not only to live for each other, but to live for you and for others. Give them a living faith which also sends them into life with a purpose to do your will. Allow them enough tears to keep them tender, enough hurts to keep them human, enough failure to keep their hands firmly held in yours, and enough success to make them sure they walk with you. Lord, may they never take each other’s love for granted

Unity Candle Ritual

The minister says: N. and N. will now light the Unity Candle. The two smaller candles represent their individual selves, burning singularly and apart from the other. They will together light the larger, single Wedding Candle, signifying that the flame which once burned alone is now joined by the other’s brightness and warmth in the unity of marriage.

Declaration of Marriage

The minister says: N. and N., inasmuch as you have declared your willingness and intention to enter the state of marriage with each other, and have declared the same in the company of God and these witnesses, and have given to each other as a symbol of this commitment these rings, by virtue of the authority vested in me as a minister of the gospel, and according to the laws of this state, I pronounce you husband and wife, united in the pure and holy bonds of wedlock. What God has joined, let no man put asunder.

Go forth from this place as wife and husband with the blessing of Christ’s church. Be loving, patient and kind. And above all, forgive one another as Christ has forgiven you.

Benediction

The minister says: God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit, bless, preserve, and keep you; the Lord mercifully with his favor look upon you; and so fill you with all spiritual benediction and grace, that you may so live together in this life, that in the world to come, you may have life everlasting. Amen.

Embrace and Kiss

The minister says: N. you may kiss the bride. They embrace and kiss.

Introduction of the Couple

The minister says: It is my pleasure to introduce to you for the first time, Mr. and Mrs. N. or, It is my pleasure to introduce to you for the first time, N. and N. N.

Recessional

The couple recesses followed by attendants and the minister.

2. A Contemporary Ceremony

Order of Service

Processional

Invocation

Welcome and Greeting

Minister’s Remarks (Homily)

Vows

Song

Exchange of Rings

Wedding Prayer

Bitter and Sweet Wine Ritual

Declaration of Marriage

Blessing

Embrace and Kiss

Introduction of the Couple

Recessional

The Ceremony

Processional

After the minister and attendants are in place, the congregation rises, and the bride proceeds down the aisle alone, or with an escort. At the altar the groom joins her, the escort is seated, and the service begins.

Invocation

The minister says: Let us pray. God of love and mercy, you have brought us here to join N. and N. together as husband and wife.

People: Love is patient.

Minister: You desire their happiness.

People: Love is kind.

Minister: You desire that they grow in wisdom and understanding.

People: Love rejoices in truth.

Minister: You desire that they live together faithfully in a covenant of trust.

People: Love bears all things.

Minister: You desire that they share their hopes and dreams together.

People: Love never ends.

Minister: You desire that they know the security of faith, the comfort of hope, and the joy of love.

People: But the greatest of these is love.

Minister: Bless them and us as we celebrate your love for us and their love for each other.

All: Amen.

Welcome and Greeting

The minister says: On behalf of N. and N., I welcome all of you to this place and to this moment when N. and N. express their love for each other and their desire to live as husband and wife. You are their friends and family, the ones they love, and your presence here demonstrates your friendship and love.

N. and N. have not come today to “get married.” The two of them have already recognized what we as family and friends also recognize, that a marriage does, in fact, already exist. For some time, they have experienced a union of mind and emotion, a shared commitment to common ideals and a longing for the public recognition of this united spirit. So today, we gather in this place, in the sight of God and these witnesses, to affirm a marriage, to pronounce upon this union the blessing of Christ’s church, and to send N. and N. forth as husband and wife.

Minister’s Remarks (Homily)

In the 1996 movie, Jerry Maguire, Tom Cruise plays a character who thinks he loves the woman who helped him maintain his career. As he struggles in his personal life and in his professional life, as he deals with a client who demands, “Show me the money,” he realizes, through a series of misfortunes, how much this woman means to him. At the end of his tether, tired and weak, he stumbles into her house in the middle of a group therapy session, and there, before everyone, declares his love for her, saying, “You complete me.”

As I recall, the object of his love simply waves her hand and says, “You can stop. You had me when you walked in and said hello.”

There is something mysterious but sacred about the marriage bond. It signifies a commitment like no other commitment.

Why?

I don’t know. But in some mystical but real sense, as you come together today in the sacrament of marriage, a union takes place that is beyond our understanding. Whereas you were two, now you are one.

N., N. believes that she can attain all that she hopes to be better with you than without you. You complete her and fulfill her. By being in her life, you give her the freedom to be the real person she is.

N., everything that N. is and hopes to be, all of his goals and dreams, he now shares with you. Without you, he is less himself. You complete him; you make him whole.

Teilhard de Chardin, the French priest and paleontologist, and author of The Divine Milieu, expressed: “Love alone takes us and completes us by what is deepest within ourselves.”

This gift of completion and love is not really your gift to each other, but God’s gift to you on your wedding day.

Vows

The minister may tie a ribbon around the hands of the bride and groom.

The minister says: Groom, please repeat after me. N., even as our hands are joined, so today our lives are joined. I join you as your husband, and you join me as my wife. We come together in the bond of love to hold each other, to caress each other, to support each other, and to love each other. I give you my pledge to keep my hands joined to yours as we journey through life together, and to walk that path with you for as long as our lives shall last.

The minister says: Bride, please repeat after me. N., even as our hands are joined, so today our lives are joined. I join you as your wife, and you join me as my husband. We come together in the bond of love to hold each other, to caress each other, to support each other, and to love each other. I give you my pledge to keep my hands joined to yours as we journey through life together, and to walk that path with you for as long as our lives shall last.

Song

The vocalist sings: “Beautiful in My Eyes” (Joshua Kadison), or “Butterfly Kisses” (Carlisle/Thomas)

Exchange of Rings

The minister says: May I have the rings? The minister takes them from the best man or maid or matron of honor, or both, or unties them from the ring bearer’s pillow. Holding the rings aloft, the minister says: These rings are an outward and visible sign of an inward and invisible grace, which unites two hearts in love. They are especially significant because the circle of these rings is a symbol of the unending and enduring quality of the love which N. and N. share today.

The bride places the groom’s ring on the fourth finger of his left hand and repeats after the minister: N., I give you this ring as a sign of my love and faithfulness.

The groom places the bride’s ring on the fourth finger of her left hand and repeats after the minister: N., I give you this ring as a sign of my love and faithfulness.

Wedding Prayer

The minister says: Let us pray. God of the days, who enables us to make promises and live them in all the seasons of life, we thank you for your sustaining care, your abiding presence, your abundant grace which sustains us through the years. We thank you for the strong, yet elastic, ties of marriage which provide a place for us to be at home and give us encouragement to broaden our identity in the wider world. Even now, we acknowledge our struggle to give the time we need for healthy relationships, and the effort we need to love each other. Bless N. and N., as they resolve this day, having found the right person, to be the right person for the other, with your divine help.

God of our lives, we know our need to rely on your love and on the help of family and friends, so we ask you to bless all of us, and guide us, and love us, as we walk in relationship with one another and you. Amen.

Bitter and Sweet Wine Ritual

Two chalices of wine have been placed on the altar before the service. One is a glass of sweet, white wine, the other a very dry, red wine.

The minister says: The years of our lives are as these cups of wine, poured out for us to drink. We have the sweet wine of life, and the bitter wine as well. N. and N. now share these cups, symbolizing their commitment to drink together of the cup of life, in its sweetness and beauty, and in its occasional bitterness. As they drink, may these cups be for them the cup of blessing, a consecration of their marriage vows.

The bride and groom drink from one cup and then the other as they exchange cups.

In another approach, you may have two small carafes on the altar, one of a sweet, white wine, the other of a dry, red wine. Two empty wine glasses are nearby. During the ritual, the minister pours a small amount of the white wine in both glasses, then letting the bride and groom drink. The minister then pours a small amount of the red wine into their glasses.

While the couple is sipping the wine, one of the following readings may be read. The bride may read to the groom and the groom to the bride before they drink the wine..

Let there be spaces in your togetherness,

And let the winds of the heavens dance between you.

Love one another, but make not a bond of love,

Let it rather be a moving sea between the shores of your souls.

Fill each other’s cup but drink not from one cup.

Give one another of your bread but eat not from the same loaf.

Sing and dance together and be joyous, but let each one of you be alone,

Even as the strings of a lute are alone though they quiver with the same music.

Give your hearts, but not into each other’s keeping.

For only the hand of Life can contain your hearts.

Drink to me only with thine eyes

And I will pledge with mine;

Or leave a kiss but in the cup,

And I’ll not ask for wine.

The thirst that from the soul doth rise

Doth ask a drink divine,

But might I of Jove’s nectar sup,

I would not change for thine.

Declaration of Marriage

The minister says: N. and N., because you have come to be joined in marriage and have expressed your commitment to each other in the sight of your friends and family, and in the sight of God, by means of your vows and these rings, I declare that you are now husband and wife.

Blessing

Now you will feel no rain

for each of you will be shelter for the other;

Now you will feel no cold

for each of you will be warmth for the other;

Now you will have no more loneliness

for each of you will be companion for the other;

Now you are two bodies

but only one life is before you;

Go now to your dwelling place

to enter into the days of your togetherness,

And may your days be good and long upon the earth.

1662 Book of Common Prayer– bless them in their work, in their companionship, in their sleeping, and in their waking. Let your Holy Spirit be upon them to keep them faithful to each other and to you, that they may know the fullness of life as you intended for your human family. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen. — from The Prophet by Kahlil Gibran– Ben Jonson

Embrace and Kiss

The minister says to the groom: You may kiss the bride.

Introduction of the Couple

The minister says: I am delighted to introduce for the first time, Mr. and Mrs. N. or, It is my pleasure to introduce for the first time N. and N. N.

Recessional

“Spring” from “The Four Seasons,” (Vivaldi) The couple and attendants recess from the sanctuary.

3. A Literary Wedding

In this ceremony, the language is somewhat stylized. The ceremony features passages from well

Order of Service

Processional

Exchange of Rings

Greeting and Welcome

Invocation

Homily

Song

Readings

Vows

Rose Ritual

Declaration of Marriage

Blessing

Embrace and Kiss

Introduction of the Couple

Recessional

The Ceremony

Processional

After the minister, groom and attendants are in place, the bride enters with her father or escort. The groom joins her as she stands before the minister. The escort and congregation sit. Music: Canon in D Major (Johann Pachelbel)

Exchange of Rings

The minister says: In the medieval tradition, the bride and groom exchanged rings at the entrance of the church before the ceremony. In this brief ritual, the couple affirmed their intention to enter into marriage with each other. As a token of that intention, they gave each other rings. While we are not at the entrance of the church, today we invoke this ancient tradition at the entrance of the ceremony. Therefore, N. and N., before God and this congregation, I ask you to affirm your willingness to enter this covenant of marriage and to share all the joys and sorrows of this new relationship, whatever the future may hold.

Addressing the groom: N., will you have N. to be your wife, and will you love her faithfully as long as you both shall live?

The groom says: I will, with God’s help.

Addressing the bride: N., will you have N. to be your husband, and will you love him faithfully as long as you both shall live?

The bride says: I will, with God’s help.

The minister says: Let us pray. Creator and sustainer of the human race, source of spiritual grace, giver of eternal salvation, send your blessing upon these rings which we bless in your most holy Name. May those who are thereby betrothed be armed with heavenly strength, and protected by your care, and experience the help of your blessing unto eternal life. Amen.

The minister, with the groom then places the ring on the left thumb of the bride saying:

In the name of the Father,

then on her index finger, saying

and of the Son,

then on her middle finger, saying

and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

And then, the ring is placed on the fourth finger of the left hand where it remains, because that finger possesses a vein which runs to the heart. The groom then repeats after the minister:

N., I give you this ring as a sign of my love and faithfulness.

The bride then says:

N., I receive this ring as a sign of your love and faithfulness.

The minister, with the bride, then places the ring on the left thumb of the groom saying:

In the name of the Father,

then on his index finger, saying

and of the Son,

then on his middle finger, saying

and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

And then, the ring is placed on the fourth finger of the left hand where it remains because that finger possesses a vein which runs to the heart. The bride then repeats after the minister:

N., I give you this ring as a sign of my love and faithfulness.

The groom says:

N., I receive this ring as a sign of your love and faithfulness.

Native American blessing-known sources. The couple may want to display many flowers, with music provided by strings or woodwinds.

The minister says: Let us pray. O Lord, Creator and sustainer of the human race, source of spiritual grace, giver of eternal life, send your blessing upon these rings which we bless in your most holy name. May both the man and woman who wear them be equipped with heavenly virtue and shielded by your protection, and may they receive the help of your blessing unto eternal life. Amen. [adapted Doc 159]

Adapted from Documents of the Marriage Liturgy, Stevenson-Searle.

Greeting and Welcome

The minister says: In this holy place, we have gathered as a community of family and friends to witness as N. and N. express their love. This is a day of joy, a wondrous moment of blessing and a beginning to many seasons of love. We are here to celebrate, support and sustain them in their marriage.

This is a holy time

This is an awesome moment

This is a joyous and hopeful day

God has brought us together, not only to support N. and N., but also to sense the wonderful mystery of love by which God makes the world sing and dance. Enter a moment of silence, and feel the blessings of a loving God while you offer your prayers for this special couple.

Invocation

The minister says: Let us pray. Eternal and loving God, by your grace, and with the encouragement of your divine Son, we have gathered to celebrate the union of N. and N. Let your spirit be truly present in our worship. May this service firmly seal their love while reminding them, and us, of your self

Homily

Madame LePrince de Beaumont concludes her book, Beauty and the Beast, with these words: “The fairy waved her wand, and everyone who was in the hall was transported to the prince’s kingdom. His subjects received him with joy, and he married Beauty, who lived with him for a long time in a state of happiness that was perfect because it was based upon virtue.”

In this story, Beauty decided to stay with the beast because she not only found him to be a wonderful friend, but discovered that she could not live without him. And when he was transformed into the prince, he was amazed because Beauty, he says, was “the only person in the world good enough to let [herself] be moved by the goodness of my character.”

Please do not misunderstand me. I do not mean to compare the two of you to Beauty and the beast! I am only suggesting that if you want beauty and the best in your marriage, learn a lesson from this story: True happiness and joys are based upon doing the right thing.

Too often, people are overly concerned about finding the right person with whom to spend the rest of their lives. I’m not sure it is a question of finding the right person as much as it is a question of being the right person. When we do what is right and fair and honest and loving; if we are humble and kind and compassionate, our marriage will be full of these same qualities. Isn’t this what the apostle Paul means when he describes true love in 1 Corinthians 13? “Love is patient; love is kind; love is not envious or boastful or arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful; it does not rejoice in wrongdoing, but rejoices in the truth.”

Beauty and the Best. Your marriage can possess both beauty and the very best of this life if it is founded upon virtue.

But what is virtue? The root meaning of virtue is “moral strength, moral excellence.” To be virtuous is to be morally strong. That’s not easy in these days of moral relativity. Virtue means the two of you must share moral values, that you must believe in something, as well as believing in each other. It means that you must resist the temptation to follow the mass who lead lives of “quiet desperation,” as Thoreau puts it, because they have lost sight of the meaning of their lives. To have both Beauty and the Best means you must have not only each other, but you must have God in your lives, who is the author of all that is beautiful and good!

Song

“Entreat Me Not to Leave Thee” (Gounod)

Readings

This part of the ceremony requires three readers, who should read from a lectern, clearly and boldly, for all to hear.

The first reading:

Go placidly amid the noise and haste, and remember what peace there often is in silence. As far as possible, without surrender, be on good terms with all persons. Speak truth quietly and clearly, and listen to others, for they too have their story.

Keep interested in your career and in life … for it is a real possession in the changing fortunes of time. And let not the problems or trickery of the world blind you to what virtue there is. Many people strive for high ideals, and everywhere, you will find life is full of beauty and heroism. So, be yourself. Never feign affection and do not be cynical about love. For in the face of all aridity and disenchantment, it is as perennial as the grass. Take kindly the counsels of the years, gracefully surrendering the things of youth. Nurture strength of spirit to shield you in sudden misfortune. And do not distress yourself with imaginings. Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself and with each other.

You are a child of the universe, no less than are the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.

Therefore, be at peace with God, whatever you conceive him to be, and whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life, keep peace with your soul. With all of the problems, drudgery, and the broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world in its light and its love. Strive to be happy.

Adapted from Documents of the Marriage Liturgy, Stevenson-Searle.– for we are in the presence of the God who created us for relationship.– for we are aware of the strong, yet fragile, cords of love which are woven today.– for we celebrate another sign that relationships are truly fashioned in quality and unity.-giving, all-conquering love. We pray in the Savior’s name. Amen.

The second reading:

To laugh often and much;

To win respect of intelligent people and the affection of children;

To earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends;

To appreciate beauty;

To find the best in others, to leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden patch, or a redeemed social condition;

To know even one life has breathed easier because you lived.

This is to have succeeded.

The final reading:

If I speak in the tongues of mortals and of angels, but do not have love, I am a noisy gong or a clanging cymbal.

And if I have prophetic powers, and understand all mysteries and all knowledge, and if I have all faith, so as to remove mountains, but do not have love, I am nothing.

If I give away all my possessions, and if I hand over my body so that I may boast, but do not have love, I gain nothing.

Love is patient;

love is kind;

love is not envious or boastful or arrogant or rude.

It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful;

it does not rejoice in wrongdoing, but rejoices in the truth.

It bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.

Love never ends ….

And now faith, hope, and love abide, these three; and the greatest of these is love.

Vows

The groom says (or reads): N., I love you and wish to be your husband, and you, my wife. I believe in our love and want you to know how much I love you. As Hamlet said to Ophelia:

Doubt thou the stars are fire,

Doubt thou the sun doth shine,

Doubt truth to be a liar,

But never doubt I love.

The bride says (or reads): N., as I become your wife today, I share with you what Anne Bradstreet wrote to her husband more than 300 years ago:

If ever two were one, then surely we,

If ever man were loved by wife, then thee,

If ever wife was happy in a man,

Compare with me ye women if you can.

I prize thy love more than whole mines of gold

Or all the riches that the East doth hold ….

Then while we live, in love let’s so persevere,

That when we live no more, we may live ever.

I vow to love with you, and live with you so long as we both shall live; to be your wife and find my happiness in you.

Rose Ritual

The bride and groom exchange roses as a symbolic offering of the first gifts which they give and receive. Red roses symbolize love, white roses, purity, and yellow roses, loyalty and faithfulness. One rose may be given or a bouquet of all three colors. The order proceeds as follows:

Minister takes roses from the altar or communion table. Turning to the couple, and giving to them the roses they will present to each other, the minister says: Roses are a traditional symbol of love. Whenever we see a single

Couple exchanges roses. Some couples may wish to leave the altar and visit the parents, with the new family member giving a rose to the mother (son

Declaration of Marriage

The couple resumes their positions in front of the minister. The minister says: N. and N., inasmuch as you have thus consented in holy wedlock, and have pledged the same with your vows and by the exchange of your rings, by virtue of the authority vested in me as a minister of the gospel, I pronounce you husband and wife, united in the pure and holy bonds of wedlock, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. What God has joined together, let no man put asunder. Amen.

Blessing

The minister says: The Lord bless you and keep you. The Lord make his face to shine upon you and be gracious unto you. The Lord lift up his countenance upon you and give you peace. Amen.

Embrace and Kiss

Before the embrace and kiss, the couple recites Percy Bysshe Shelley:

The groom says (or reads): The fountains mingle with the river,

And the rivers with the Ocean;

The winds of heaven mix forever

With a sweet emotion;

Nothing in the world is single;

All things by a law divine

In one spirit meet and mingle.

Why not I with thine?

The bride says (or reads): See the mountains kiss high heaven,

And the waves clasp one another;

No sister flower would be forgiven

If it disdained its brother;

And the sunlight clasps the earth,

And the moonbeams kiss the sea:

What is all this sweet work worth

If thou kiss not me?

The bride and groom embrace and kiss.

Introduction of the Couple

The minister says: It is my great pleasure to introduce to you for the first time, Mr. and Mrs. N.

Recessional

The couple recesses, followed by the attendants and minister. Music: Postlude in G Major (G. F. Handel)

4. The Outdoor Ceremony

Order of Service

The Gathering

Invocation

Greeting and Welcome

Homily

Song

Vows

Exchange of Rings

Reading from Scripture

Declaration of Marriage

Benediction

Embrace and Kiss

Introduction of the Couple

Dismissal

The Ceremony

The Gathering

When the guests have arrived, the minister may gather everyone by announcing that the ceremony will begin. Although some outdoor weddings are very formal, most are somewhat informal. Processional music can be offered by a live musician (guitar, flute, string quartet) or by tape or CD. The bride may process to where the minister and groom and attendants are waiting, or the wedding party may be convened at the minister’s direction.

Invocation

When all is ready, the minister says: Let us pray. Eternal and loving God, we are gathered in this beautiful location to celebrate the marriage of N. and N. We stand small in this display of your creative handiwork. It reminds us that we, too, are part of your grand design. We know the same God who brought these mountains into being, also desires to be present with these, your children, as they begin their life together. Grant us a renewed understanding of what it means to be in covenant with each other as N. and N. become husband and wife in the company of these friends, and in your holy presence. Amen.

Greeting and Welcome

The minister says: In the beauty and splendor of this place, we gather as a community of friends. We experience ripples of excitement and tremors of joy as we come to celebrate the marriage of N. and N. God has created a world of harmony

God’s first gift was breathing life into humans and turning us toward each other to live in equality and unity. N. and N. have come to affirm their love for each other and to enter into this sacred union.

Homily

The minister says: N. and N., you have chosen a beautiful background for your wedding. Being outdoors makes this event particularly special. We have moved beyond the confines of walls, or mortar and timbers, to the expansive world of the outdoors, where God’s creative work is more visible.

This reminds us that you

As we look upon these beautiful surroundings, we remember that beauty is a creative process. Marriage is a creative process as well. Although we like to say that today you are “getting married,” as you leave this place, you will enter the process of “becoming married.” For marriage to achieve its fullest, most unique and beautiful expression, takes time. It is a creative process.

Thus, the key word for you today is “creativity.” The human creature is tremendously resourceful. We are able to develop ideas, inventions and amazing new ways of doing things. When it comes to a marriage and relationships, however, many of us suddenly seem to go brain

N. and N., you are creative, intelligent people. Use that creativity to be spontaneous, unpredictable. Use it to nurture your love. Use creativity to strengthen your bond. Use creativity to solve problems that arise. Use creativity to release you from conventional thinking and free you to explore the road less travelled. Use creativity to deepen your love.

As you do this, you will discover your marriage “becoming” something as beautiful as these mountains. You will find your marriage becoming strong, meaningful, beautiful and the absolutely most important component of your life. Amen.

Song

“Wedding Song” (“There is Love”) (Paul Stookey) Or substitute this reading:

You are my beloved, I will always cherish you.

You are my beloved, I see your great beauty.

You are my beloved, I feel your great power.

You are my beloved, I respect your great wisdom.

You are my beloved, my home is with you.

You are my beloved, I value your independence.

You are my beloved, I am radiant in your love.

I will always love you.

I will always love you.

I will always love you.

I will always love you.

Vows

The minister says (addressing the groom): Do you, N., take, N., to be your wife, and in doing so, give your life to her, and all that life entails, to take the good with the bad, to live with her through hardship and triumph, to live with her in the commitment of faith, the security of hope, and the joy of love.

The groom says: I do.

The minister says (addressing the bride): Do you, N., take N. to be your husband, and in doing so, give your life to him, and all that life entails, to take the good with the bad, to live with him through hardship and triumph, to live with him in the commitment of faith, the security of hope, and the joy of love?

The bride says: I do.

Exchange of Rings

The minister says: May I have the rings? The minister takes them from the best man or maid or matron of honor, or both, or unties them from the ring bearer’s pillow. Holding the rings aloft, the minister says: These rings are an outward and visible sign of an inward and invisible grace, which unites two hearts in love, and they are of special significance because the circle of these rings is a symbol of the unending and enduring quality of the love which N. and N. are sharing today.

The bride places the groom’s ring on the fourth finger of his left hand and repeats after the minister: N., I give you this ring as a sign of my love and faithfulness.

The groom places the bride’s ring on the fourth finger of her left hand and repeats after the minister: N., I give you this ring as a sign of my love and faithfulness.

The minister wraps his or her stole around the hands of the couple and prays: By these rings, O God, join N. and N. together, and bless these rings, O God, that those who wear them, who give and receive them, may be ever faithful to one another, remain in your peace, and live and grow old together in your love. Amen.

Reading from Scripture

The minister or other designated person reads: I lift up my eyes to the hills

The “Desiderata”– Ralph Waldo Emerson (also attributed to Harry Emerson Fosdick)– 1 Corinthians 13-stem rose, or a bouquet of roses, we are reminded of the human love shared between two people. N. and N., as you prepare to give each other these roses, remember that they symbolize your love. In the future, when you wish to acknowledge your love because of your happiness, or to remind each other of your love because of some temporary misunderstanding, place a rose in your presence. Let the fragrance of this most beautiful flower remind you of the fragrance of the love you share. Let this rose be the first gift you give and the first gift you receive as husband and wife. You may exchange your roses.-in-law to his mother-in-law; daughter-in-law to her mother-in-law).– Love’s Philosophy– dazzling flowers, soaring birds, running deer and roaring oceans — each unique, each in relationship and harmony with the others. — both of you — are part of God’s creative design. Your own uniqueness has attracted each of you to the other. That uniqueness is God’s gift to you, and a gift you should cherish.-dead. We are sometimes puzzled by the inevitable adjustments we must make in any relationship.– Native American tradition– from where will my help come? My help comes from the Lord, who made heaven and earth. He will not let your foot be moved; he who keeps you will not slumber. He who keeps Israel will neither slumber nor sleep. The Lord is your keep; the Lord is your shade at your right hand. The sun shall not strike you by day, nor the moon by night. The Lord will keep you from all evil; he will keep your life. The Lord will keep your going out and your coming in from this time on and forevermore.

Declaration of Marriage

The minister says: N. and N., because you have declared your willingness and intention to enter into the state of marriage with each other, and have declared the same in the company of God and these witnesses, and have given these rings to each other as a symbol of this commitment, by virtue of the authority vested in me as a minister of the gospel, I pronounce you husband and wife, united in the pure and holy bonds of wedlock. What God has joined, let no man put asunder.

Benediction

May the road rise to meet you.

May the wind be always at your back.

May the sun shine warm upon your face.

May the rains fall softly upon your fields until we meet again.

May God hold you in the hollow of His hand.

Embrace and Kiss

The minister says (addressing the groom): N., you may kiss the bride. They embrace and kiss.

Introduction of the Couple

The minister says: It is my pleasure to introduce for the first time, N. and N. N.

Dismissal

The wedding party leaves as it was convened. If they followed a processional, the couple and attendants may recess. Otherwise, the couple may immediately begin greeting family and friends. They may proceed informally with post

5. A Postmodern Ceremony

Order of Service

The baby boomer generation tossed tradition out the window and preferred casual, “contemporary” ceremonies when they married in the late ’60s, ’70s, and early ’80s. Generation Xers, however, have returned to a mix of tradition and postmodernism. Most Xers prefer a ceremony with strong traditional elements, and the reception becomes the vehicle for postmodernist expression, especially in music. This postmodern ceremony couples a Christian tradition with music and readings which express a postmodern understanding of life and relationships.

Processional

Invocation

Welcome and Greeting

Reading from Scripture

Homily

Vows

Reading

Song

Exchange of Rings

Bitter and Sweet Wine Ritual

Declaration of Marriage

Personal Statements

Blessing

Embrace and Kiss

Introduction of the Couple

Recessional

The Ceremony

The bride and groom may prefer to hold the wedding in a hotel, home, reception hall or outdoors. Yet, Xers, more than boomers, prefer churches for their ceremonies. This ceremony is based on the event taking place in the church sanctuary.

Processional

When the minister, groom, and attendants are in place, the bride may process down the aisle with her escort. Music: Trumpet Tune in D (Purcell)

Invocation

The minister says: God of Creation, we gather now at the creation of a new life, the shared life of N. and N. You created the world around us, you created us, and now, as you bring these two together, you again are starting something new and beautiful. Grace these moments with your creative presence. In the name of Jesus the Christ. Amen.

Welcome and Greeting

The minister says: In this holy place, we have gathered as a community of family and friends to witness. N and N. express their love. This is a day of joy, a wondrous moment of blessing and a beginning to many seasons of love. We are here to celebrate, support and sustain them in their marriage.

This is a holy time

This is an awesome moment

This is a joyous and hopeful day

God has brought us together, not only to support N. and N., but also to sense the wonderful mystery of love by which God makes the world sing and dance. Enter a moment of silence and feel the blessings of a loving God as you offer your prayers for this special couple.

Silence.

Reading from Scripture

Then God said, “Let us make humankind in our image, according to our likeness, and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the birds of the air, and over the cattle and over all the wild animals of the earth, and over every creeping thing that creeps upon the earth. So God created humankind in his image, in the image of God he created them; male and female he created them. God blessed them, and God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply, and fill the earth and subdue it; and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the air and over every living thing that moves upon the earth … God saw everything that he had made, and indeed, it was very good.

Then the LORD God said, “It is not good that the man should be alone; I will make him a helper as his partner.” So out of the ground the LORD God formed every animal of the field and every bird of the air, and brought them to the man to see what he would call them; and whatever the man called every living creature, that was its name. The man gave names to all cattle, and to the birds of the air, and to every animal of the field; but for the man there was not found a helper as his partner. So the LORD God caused a deep sleep to fall upon the man, and he slept; then he took one of his ribs and closed up its place with flesh. And the rib that the LORD God had taken from the man he made into a woman and brought her to the man. Then the man said, “This at last is bone of my bones and flesh of my flesh; this one shall be called Woman, for out of Man this one was taken.” Therefore a man leaves his father and his mother and clings to his wife, and they become one flesh.

Psalm 121– Old Gaelic Blessing-ceremony plans.– for we are in the presence of the God who created us for relationship.– for we are aware of the strong, yet fragile, cords of love which are being woven today.– for we celebrate another sign that relationships are truly fashioned in quality and unity.

Homily

The minister says: Marriage is a leap of faith. Today, after many weeks, even months, of planning, your beautiful celebration has come together. All right, maybe not exactly as you planned, but close. The only important detail is that you are here, together, as you will be as long as you both shall live.

Although I insisted you plan your marriage with as much care as you planned your wedding, I have a confession: Married life won’t happen the way you planned. You have planned your finances carefully, but something will happen that you didn’t envision. You have made some plans for the family you will become … but children may not arrive on schedule, and they may not be as you imagined. You have made career plans, but you will adjust them according to how you develop. Both of you will find your needs and expectations changing over time. You will need to make new plans, but you have already learned how to cooperate to reach important decisions.

Today, you take a leap of faith. You have excellent reasons for believing you belong together. But you do not have guarantees. Instead, you stand together, about to accept on faith the challenge of creating the future together.

“Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for ….” You marry in faith that God has called you to live as one. You promise to be faithful to one another, in big things as well as small. Your constant faith in each other will give form and substance to the beautiful hopes you have for your future.

Faith is “the conviction of things not seen ….” Unless you are an unusual couple, at times your marriage won’t look anything like the vision you celebrate today. You may not feel much evidence of the love you now feel so keenly. At such a time, you must look for evidence, for reasons to hang on to

Marriage begins with a leap of faith that says “I do, and I will” before an unknown and unknowable future. Marriage is about being full of faith, or faithful, to one another. Faithfulness respects each other’s ideas, keeps each other’s secrets, guards each other’s dignity, and honors each other in public and in private. Faithfulness is built from 10,000 minute acts of trust and trustworthiness. In such faith, you will find the fulfillment of all the hopes you have today. God bless you both. Amen.

Vows

The minister says (addressing the groom): N., please repeat after me.

N., I take you to be my wife,

together to love,

to work and to share,

to grow and to understand,

to discover a deeper, fuller life.

The minister says (addressing the bride): N., please repeat after me.

N., I take you to be my husband,

together to love,

to work and to share,

to grow and to understand,

to discover a deeper, fuller life.

Reading

The reader, who may be the minister or a designated person, says:

As for your name and your body, which is the dearer?

As for your body and your wealth, which is the more to be prized?

As for gain and loss, which is the more painful?

Thus, an excessive love for anything will cost you dear in the end.

The storing up of too much goods will entail a heavy loss.

To know when you have enough is to be immune from disgrace.

To know when to stop is to be preserved from perils.

Only thus can you endure long.

Song

“All I Ask of You” (Andrew Lloyd Webber)

Exchange of Rings

The minister says: These rings are an outward sign of an invisible truth which binds two hearts in one. As such, they are a symbol of the enduring and unending quality of the love which is now expressed between these two.

The bride places the ring on the fourth finger of the groom’s left hand and says: N., I give you this ring as a sign of my love and faithfulness.

The groom places the ring on the fourth finger of the bride’s left hand and says: N., I give you this ring as a sign of my love and faithfulness.

The minister prays: Bless these rings, O merciful Lord, that those who wear them, who give and receive them, may be ever faithful to one another, remain in your peace, and live and grow old together in your love. Amen.

Genesis 1:26-28, 31; 2:18-24:– in the same faith that brought you here today — the conviction that God has called you together. In the power of God’s love and faithfulness to you, you will find the power to keep loving each other until the sun rises again and romance flowers anew.– Tao Te Ching, 44

Bitter and Sweet Wine Ritual

Two chalices of wine rest on the altar. One is full of sweet, white wine, the other a very dry, red wine.

The minister says: The years of our lives are as these cups of wine poured for us to drink. We experience the sweet wine of life, as well as the bitter wine. N. and N. now share these cups, symbolizing their commitment to drink together of the cup of life, in its sweetness and beauty, and in its occasional bitterness. As they drink, may these cups be for them the cup of blessing, a consecration of their marriage vows.

The bride and groom drink from the one cup and then the other as they exchange cups.

In another approach, one small carafe on the altar holds sweet, white wine, another carafe holds a dry, red wine. Two empty wine glasses are placed nearby. During the ritual, the minister pours a small amount of the white wine into both of their glasses. They drink the wine. The minister then pours red wine into their glasses, which they also consume.

While the couple is sipping wine, this may be read:

Love is friendship that has caught fire. It is quiet understanding, mutual confidence, sharing and forgiving. It is loyalty through good and bad times. It settles for less than perfection and makes allowances for human weaknesses.

Love is content with the present, it hopes for the future, and it doesn’t brood over the past. It’s the day

If you have love in your life, it can make up for many things you lack. If you don’t have it, no matter what else you have, it’s not enough.

Declaration of Marriage

The minister says: N. and N., inasmuch as you have declared your willingness and intention to enter the state of marriage with each other, and have declared the same in the company of God and these witnesses, and have given these rings to each other as a symbol of this commitment, I pronounce you husband and wife.

Personal Statements

The groom and the bride now offer their vision of their relationship in an extended reading which is less formal and more extensive than the vows.

Blessing

The wedding is not over; it is just beginning. Not once and forever, but again and again, shall the mystery of two people, together and in love, move one another and touch the world. For marriage is not something said and done, but a promise in which fulfillment is acted out in time. N. and N., may the blessings that rest upon all who love, rest also upon you and fill you with all spiritual grace. May the bond that unites you ever be strengthened. May you so love and work together in the days ahead that your lives shall be enriched and ennobled by a true and deepening comradeship of mind and heart.

And now, may the presence of God the Father, Son and Holy Spirit be with you and abide with you. May the love in your hearts and the greatness of life’s possibilities give you joy. And may the assurance of your friends’ and families’ good wishes give you peace and strength. Amen.

Embrace and Kiss

The minister tells the bride: You may kiss the groom. They embrace and kiss.

Introduction of the Couple

The minister says: I am pleased to introduce to you for the first time, N. and N. N.

Recessional

The bride and groom recess, followed by attendants and minister. Music: Trumpet Voluntary (John Stanley)

6. An Ecumenical Ceremony

This ceremony is reprinted with permission from A Christian Celebration of Marriage: An Ecumenical Liturgy, The Consultation on Common Texts (Minneapolis: Augsburg Fortress, 1995).

Order of Service

Gathering

Greeting

Questions to the Congregation and the Couple

Public Declaration of Intention

Affirmation by Families and Congregation

Prayer of the Day

Word of God

Gospel Sermon or Homily

The Marriage

Marriage Vows

Exchange of Rings

Announcement of the Marriage

Prayers

Prayers of Intercession

Prayer of Blessing

Lord’s Prayer

Conclusion

Sign of Peace

Dismissal

Texts said by the congregation are in boldface italic.

Music is suggested as a preference or as an option in the following places:

At the Gathering

The Psalm following the First Reading

Following the Sermon

Following the Announcement of the Marriage

At the Dismissal

The Ceremony

Gathering

The people gather, forming a community of friends of the couple, to offer thanks to God, to serve as witnesses, and to assure the couple of their continuing support and love. Make sure you show hospitality to welcome all those who are not part of the local congregation.

The congregation stands.

The ministers enter and go to the entrance of the church to welcome the wedding party.

After they have greeted the bride and the bridegroom, the entire party enters the church and stands in front of the assembly. The procession may take this order: cross and torches, assisting ministers, host and guest presiding ministers, attendants, parents and bride and bridegroom.

A hymn or psalm may be sung during the entrance, or music may be performed by instrumentalists or a choir.

[If you desire a simpler entrance, the ministers come before the assembly. The bride, bridegroom and their attendants enter the church together and stand before the ministers and the assembly.]

Greeting

A minister says: The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, the love of God and the communion of the Holy Spirit be with you all.

And also with you.

Dear friends: We have come together in the presence of God to witness the marriage of N. and N., to surround them with our prayers, and to share their joy. The Scriptures teach us that the bond and covenant of marriage is a gift of God, a holy mystery in which man and woman become one flesh, an image of the union of Christ and the church. As this man and this woman give themselves to each other today, we remember that at Cana in Galilee, our Lord Jesus Christ made the wedding feast a sign of God’s kingdom of love. Let us enter this celebration confident that, through the Holy Spirit, Christ is present with us now also; we pray that this couple may fulfill God’s purpose for their whole lives.

If required by law or local custom:

Questions to the Congregation and the Couple

A minister says to the congregation: These two persons have come here to become one in this holy union. But if any of you can show just cause why they may not lawfully be married, declare it now or hereafter remain silent.

A minister says to the couple: N. and N., have you come here freely and without reservation to join together lawfully in marriage?

The bride and bridegroom separately respond: I have.

Public Declaration of Intention

A minister says to the bride: N., will you have N. to be your husband, to live together in a holy marriage? Will you love him, comfort him, honor and keep him, in sickness and in health, and, forsaking all others, be faithful to him as long as you both shall live?

The bride responds: I will.

A minister says to the bridegroom: N., will you have N. to be your wife, to live together in a holy marriage? Will you love her, comfort her, honor and keep her, in sickness and in health, and, forsaking all others, be faithful to her as long as you both shall live?

The bridegroom responds: I will.

Affirmation by Families and Congregation

A minister says to the families: Do you, the families of N. and N. give your love and blessing to this new family?

We do.

A minister says to the congregation: Will all of you, by God’s grace, do everything in your power to uphold and care for these two persons in their life together?

We will.

Prayer of the Day

A minister says: Let us pray. Gracious God, you sent your Son Jesus Christ into the world to reveal your love to all people. Enrich these your servants with every good gift, that their life together may show your love. Grant that at the last we may all celebrate with Christ the marriage feast which has no ending. In the name of Jesus Christ our Lord.

Amen.

The congregation sits.

Word of God

Three (or two) readings may be chosen, one of which is always from the Gospels.

First Reading

Before the First Reading, the reader may say: A reading from (the name

of the book of the Bible).

At the conclusion of the First Reading, the reader may say: The Word of the Lord.

The congregation may respond: Thanks be to God. A psalm or hymn may be sung as a response to the First Reading.

Second Reading

Before the Second Reading, the reader may say: A reading from (the name of the book of the Bible).

At the conclusion of the Second reading, the reader may say: The Word of the Lord.

The congregation may respond: Thanks be to God.

An acclamation (Alleluia) or hymn may be sung to prepare for the gospel. All may stand for the gospel.

Gospel

Before the gospel, the minister who reads it may say: The holy gospel of our Lord Jesus Christ according to (the name of the gospel).

The congregation may respond: Glory to you, O Lord.

At the conclusion of the gospel, the minister may say: The gospel of the Lord.

And the congregation may respond: Praise to you, Lord Jesus Christ.

The congregation is seated.

A Sermon or Homily is then preached.

Sermon or Homily

A hymn may be sung; the congregation may stand.

The Marriage

Marriage Vows

The congregation is seated.

The bride and bridegroom stand before the congregation, facing each other.

A minister says: Join your hands and declare your vows.

The bride and bridegroom join their hands and speak so that all can hear. The minister may discreetly help the couple proclaim their vows.

The bridegroom says: In the presence of God and this community, I, N., take you, N., to be my wife; to have and to hold from this day forward, in joy and in sorrow, in plenty and in want, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, as long as we both shall live. This is my solemn vow.

The bride says: In the presence of God and this community, I, N., take you, N., to be my husband; to have and to hold from this day forward, in joy and in sorrow, in plenty and in want, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, as long as we both shall live. This is my solemn vow.

Exchange of Rings

Preferably, two rings are exchanged. The rings are placed on a suitable plate, or on the minister’s service book, or are held by an assisting minister.

A minister says: Bless, O Lord, (the giving of) these rings; may they who wear them live in love and fidelity, and continue in your service all the days of their lives, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

[If only one ring is exchanged: Bless, O Lord, (the giving of) this ring; may he who gives it and she who wears it live in love and fidelity, and continue in your service all the days of their lives, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.]

The bridegroom places the ring on the bride’s finger, and speaks so that all can hear: N., I give you this ring, as a sign of the covenant we have made today. [In the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.]

The bride places the ring on the bridegroom’s finger, and speaks so that all can hear: N., I give you this ring, as a sign of the covenant we have made today. [In the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit.]

[If only one ring is exchanged, the appropriate omission is made.]

If customary, other suitable tokens may be exchanged or used at this time.

Announcement of the Marriage

A minister says: Now that N. and N. have given themselves to each other by solemn vows, with the joining of hands and the giving of rings, I announce to you that they are husband and wife. Those whom God has joined together, let no one put asunder.

Blessed be the Lord our God now and forever. Amen.

A hymn may be sung.

Prayers

Prayers of Intercession

The congregation stands.

A minister says: Friends of Christ, in the midst of our joy, let us pray for this broken world. For all people in their daily lives and work; for our families, friends and neighbors, and for all whose lives touch ours, we pray to the Lord.

Lord, hear our prayer.

For this holy fellowship of faith in which we seek your grace; for the world, the nation and this community, in which we work for justice, freedom and peace, we pray to the Lord.

Lord, hear our prayer.

For the just and proper use of your creation; for the victims of hunger, injustice and oppression, we pray to the Lord.

Lord, hear our prayer.

For all who are in danger, sorrow or any kind of trouble; for those who minister to the sick, the friendless and the needy, we pray to the Lord.

Lord, hear our prayer.

For those who have suffered the loss of a child or parent, husband or wife; for those to whom love is a stranger, we pray to the Lord.

Lord, hear our prayer.

[You may add other intercessions.]

Most gracious God, you have made us in your own image and given us to one another’s care. Hear the prayers of your people, that unity may overcome division, hope vanquish despair, and joy conquer sorrow; through Jesus Christ our Lord.

Amen.

Prayer of Blessing

The couple may kneel.

A minister says: Blessed are you, Lord God, heavenly Father. In your great love you created us male and female and made the union of husband and wife an image of the covenant between you and your people. You sent Jesus Christ to come among us, making your love visible in him, to bring new life to the world. Send your Holy Spirit to pour out the abundance of your blessing on N. and N., who have this day given themselves to each other in marriage. Bless them in their work and in their companionship, in their sleeping and in their waking, in their joys and in their sorrows, in their life and in their death. [Give them the gift and heritage of children in accordance with your will, and make their home a haven of peace.] Let their love for each other be a seal upon their hearts, a mantle about their shoulders, and a crown upon their foreheads. Bless them so that all may see in their lives together within the community of your people, a vision of your kingdom on earth. And finally, in the fullness of time, welcome them into the glory of your presence. Through your Son Jesus Christ with the Holy Spirit in your holy church, all honor and glory is yours, almighty Father, now and forever. Amen.

Lord’s Prayer

A minister says: With the confidence of God’s children, let us pray:

Our Father in heaven, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come, your will be done, on earth as in heaven. Give us today our daily bread. Forgive us our sins as we forgive those who sin against us. Save us from the time of trial and deliver us from evil. For the kingdom, the power, and the glory are yours, now and for ever. Amen.

The couple rises.

Conclusion

Sign of Peace.

The husband and wife may greet each other with a kiss. Greetings may be exchanged throughout the congregation.

Dismissal

A minister says: The Lord bless you and keep you. The Lord make his face shine on you and be gracious to you. The Lord look upon you with favor and give you peace.

Amen.

A minister says: Go in peace to love and serve the Lord.

Thanks be to God.

The wedding party then leaves the church. A hymn, a psalm or choral music may be sung or instrumental music may be played.

7. A Traditional Ceremony With Communion

This service is designed for Holy Communion to be taken only by the couple. For orders in which Communion is offered to all the gathered guests, consult specific denominational resources.

Order of Service

Invocation

Welcome and Greeting

[Question to the Couple]

The Scripture Lesson

Homily

Declaration of Intention

Vows

Song

The Scripture Lesson: Second Reading

The Exchange of Rings

Declaration of Marriage

The Scripture Lesson: the Gospel

Prayer of Dedication

Holy Communion

The Lord’s Prayer

Benediction

Embrace and Kiss

Introduction

The Ceremony

Invocation

The minister says: Eternal and loving God, by your grace, and with the encouragement of your divine Son, we have gathered joyfully to celebrate the union of N. and N. Let your spirit be truly present in our common worship. May this service firmly seal their love while reminding them, and us, of your self

The congregation is seated.

Welcome and Greeting

The minister says: We are gathered here to unite N. and N. in marriage, which is an honorable institution, ordained by the church, blessed by Jesus with his presence at the marriage at Cana in Galilee, and perpetuated by the faithful keep of honorable men and women throughout the ages. This simple ceremony, this celebration, is the outward token of a sacred and inward union of hearts, a union created by loving purpose and kept by abiding will.

N. and N., we have assembled here with you to help you give added life to this marriage that you have chosen. For nothing is greater for two human souls than to feel they are joined together in their Creator’s presence to strengthen each other in all gladness, to be one with each other in the silent unspeakable memories of the heart, and to let their private happiness lead them into decisions and deeds that contribute to the lives of others and the betterment of our world.

The minister says to the congregation: N. and N. welcome you, their families and friends. Each of you has given something of yourself into their lives. They want you to know that your love, guidance and encouragement will be forever appreciated. It is fitting, then, that you should share this celebration of their commitment to each other to live their lives together.

N. and N., in this spirit, you two have come to be married.

[Question to the Couple]

The minister says: Who gives this woman to be married to this man? The bride’s father or designated person, or family members respond by saying: I do or We do.

The Scripture Lesson

The minister or designated person reads:

Ruth said,

“Do not press me to leave you

or to turn back from following you!

Where you do, I will go;

Where you lodge, I will lodge;

your people shall be my people,

and your God my God.

Where you die, I will die

May the LORD do thus and so to me,

and more as well,

if even death parts me from you!”

Homily

Declaration of Intention

The minister says: Before God and this congregation, I ask you to affirm your willingness to enter this covenant of marriage and to share all the joys and sorrows of this new relationship, whatever the future may hold.

Addressing the groom: N., will you have N. to be your wife, and will you love her faithfully as long as you both shall live?

The groom says: I will, with the help of God.

Addressing the bride: N., will you have N. to be your husband, and will you love him faithfully as long as you both shall live?

The bride says: I will, with the help of God.

Vows

The minister says to the groom: N., please repeat after me:

N., today I take you as my wife.

I promise to love you,

and to sustain you in the covenant of marriage.

For me, this means I promise to be there for you

regardless of our material standing in the world

and regardless of the strength of our physical health.

I expect nothing in this world

except that my love for you will grow,

and that rather than decreasing

as the years wear upon us,

will instead become stronger and deeper.

This is my pledge I make to you

on this our wedding day.

The minister says to the bride: N., please repeat after me:

N., today I take you as my husband.

I promise to love you,

and to sustain you in the covenant of marriage.

For me, this means I promise to be there for you

regardless of our material standing in the world

and regardless of the strength of our physical health.

I expect nothing in this world

except that my love for you will grow,

and that rather than decreasing

as the years wear upon us,

will instead become stronger and deeper.

This is my pledge I make to you on this our wedding day.

Song

“When I Fall in Love” (Victor Young)

The Scripture Lesson

The minister or designated person reads: As God’s chosen ones, holy and beloved, clothe yourselves with compassion, kindness, humility, meekness, and patience. Bear with one another and, if anyone has a complaint against another, forgive each other; just as the Lord has forgiven you, so you also must forgive. Above all, clothe yourselves with love, which binds everything together in perfect harmony. And let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, to which indeed you were called in the one body. And be thankful. Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly; teach and admonish one another in all wisdom; and with gratitude in your hearts sing psalms, hymns, and spiritual songs to God. And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him.

The Exchange of Rings

The minister says: May I have the rings? The minister takes them from the best man or maid or matron of honor, or both, or unties them from the ring bearer’s pillow. Holding the rings aloft, the minister says: These rings are an outward and visible sign of an inward and invisible grace which unites two hearts in love, and they are of special significance because the circle of these rings is a symbol of the unending and enduring quality of the love which N. and N. are sharing today.

The bride places the ring on the fourth finger of the groom’s left hand and repeats these words after the minister: N., I give you this ring as a sign of my love and faithfulness.

The minister says: Let us pray: Bless, O God, the giving of this ring; may she who gives it and he who wears it live in love and fidelity, and continue in your service all the days of their lives, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

The groom places the ring on the fourth finger of the bride’s left hand and repeats these words after the minister: N., I give you this ring as a sign of my love and faithfulness.

The minister says: Let us pray. Bless, O God, the giving of this ring, that he who gives it and she who wears it live in love and fidelity, and continue in your service all the days of their lives, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Declaration of Marriage

The minister says: Inasmuch as you, N. and N., have given yourselves to each other by solemn vows in the sight of God and these friends, and have expressed that commitment with the joining of hands and the giving of rings, I pronounce you husband and wife, united in the pure and holy bonds of wedlock. Those whom God has joined together, let no one put asunder.

The Scripture Lesson

The congregation should stand. The minister says: Here the Word of the Lord according to the gospel of John: As the Father has loved me, so I have loved you; abide in my love. If you keep my commandments, you will abide in my love, just as I have kept my Father’s commandments and abide in his love. I have said these things to you so that my joy may be in you, and that your joy may be complete.

This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you. No one has greater love than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends. You are my friends if you do what I command you. I do not call you servants any longer, because the servant does not know what the master is doing; but I have called you friends, because I have made known to you everything that I have heard from my Father. You did not choose me but I chose you. And I appointed you to go and bear fruit, fruit that will last, so that the Father will give you whatever you ask him in my name. I am giving you these commands so that you may love one another.

Prayer of Dedication

The minister prays: God of love, shower your grace upon N. and N., who come to you and pledge themselves to live together in holy marriage. Give them wisdom and devotion in their common life, that each may be to the other a strength in need, a counselor in perplexity, a comfort in sorrow and a companion in joy. When selfishness shows itself, grant generosity. When mistrust is a temptation, give patience and gentleness. When suffering becomes their lot, give them a strong faith and abiding hope. Give to them such fulfillment of their mutual affection that their marriage will be an example and an inspiration to us all. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Holy Communion

The couple kneels. The minister says: Just as we learn of Christ’s ministry when it began at the marriage feast in Cana of Galilee, so also we learn of Christ’s ministry and love for us in his death at Calvary. As N. and N. partake of their first Communion as husband and wife, let us thoughtfully remember the meaning of his suffering for us. May the selfless love of Christ be for us a model by which we pattern our own lives.

The minister says: Let us pray. We thank you, O God our Creator, that you create, love and care for all that is. We praise you that in Jesus, you satisfy the needs of the human heart, that you bring to us the peace which passes understanding, that you fill us with your Holy Spirit, empowering and equipping us for your service in the world. We are grateful for the Cross of Jesus Christ, which stands as an eternal reminder of your great love for us all. Bless these moments in which N. and N. remember the suffering of your Son, Jesus Christ. Through the gifts of the bread and wine, link them to yourself as they follow your will, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

The minister says: On the same night of his betrayal, Jesus took bread, gave thanks, broke it, and gave it to the disciples, saying: “Take and eat, this is my body broken for you.”

Likewise, Jesus took the cup of blessing and said: “This cup is the cup of the new covenant in my blood, poured out for you and for many for the forgiveness of sins. Drink this in memory of me.”

The elements are on the altar and may now be offered to the couple: first the bread, and then the cup. They partake. Then the minister says: Let us pray. Gracious God, pour out your blessing on N. and N. May the love which they have for each other be the sacrificial love with which your Son Jesus loved us. May they daily experience the power of the cross in their lives, learning that in giving one receives, and in dying one is born to eternal life. Through Christ, with Christ, and in Christ, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, now and forever. Amen.

The Lord’s Prayer

The minister says: Let us now say together the prayer of our Lord. The minister leads the couple and the congregation in the Lord’s Prayer.

Benediction

The couple rises. The minister says: You are wife and husband. Go from this place with God’s blessing, the encouragement of your friends gathered here today, the support of your family, and the bond of love by which you are now united to each other. Amen.

Embrace and Kiss

The minister tells the groom: You may kiss the bride.

Introduction

The minister says: I am pleased to introduce for the first time, Mr. and Mrs. N. or, N. and N. N.

Recessional

Music: “Fanfare” (Lemmons)

8. For Blended Families

Processional

Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring (J.S. Bach)

The groom and the minister enter the sanctuary. The children may stand were the bride and groom choose. The groom’s children may stand with him, or the daughters may prefer to be on the bride’s side. The children may also be attendants and enter the sanctuary one at a time.

After the attendants are in position, the bride enters and proceeds down the aisle, escorted by her father, or one or more of her children. She comes to the altar with her escort(s) and stands.

Invocation

The minister says: Let us pray. Gracious and loving Father, we gather at this moment and on this special day to bring together N. and N as husband and wife. We rejoice in their love for each other and the love they have for their families. We pray that their home will be blessed with joy and happiness, and that they will find in you a source of strength and wisdom, and find in each other friendship, companionship and love. We ask through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Welcome and Greeting

The minister says: On behalf of N. and N., I welcome you as we celebrate their marriage. This event has been eagerly anticipated for a long time, and N. and N. are excited that you are here to express your friendship and love for them on their special day. Family members are also here today: parents and grandparents, aunts and uncles. And the children of these families are also here

Release of the Bride to the Groom

If the children of the bride did not escort her down the aisle to the altar, they may step to her side at this time and join the bride’s father, their grandfather. The minister says: Who presents this woman to be married to this man?

The family members standing by the bride may say: We do. Or one of the bride’s children may take the opportunity to read something appropriate, or to say: My sister(s)/brother(s) and I are excited about this marriage, not only because our mother and N. love each other, but because, together, they have a lot of love for us. We gladly offer our enthusiastic support; we present now, with our love and prayers, our mother for marriage to N., soon to be our stepdad. We’re ready. They’re ready. Let’s do it!

The children resume their positions as attendants, or are seated nearby. The groom steps to the bride’s side.

Reading from Scripture

The minister says: The reading is taken from John’s gospel. As the Father has loved me, so I have loved you; abide in my love. If you keep my commandments, you will abide in my love, just as I have kept my Father’s commandments and abide in his love. I have said these things to you so that my joy may be in you, and that your joy may be complete.

This is my commandment, that you love one another as I have loved you. No one has greater love than this, to lay down one’s life for one’s friends. You are my friends if you do what I command you. I do not call you servants any longer, because the servant does not know what the master is doing; but I have called you friends, because I have made known to you everything that I have heard from my Father. You did not choose me but I chose you. And I appointed you to go and bear fruit, fruit that will last, so that the Father will give you whatever you ask him in my name. I am giving you these commands so that you may love one another.

Homily

The minister says: In our conversations, we have discussed the blending of two families which is occurring today. Where once two families existed, today there will be one. In fact, however, we are not blending two families, we are joining together two persons who happen to have families. For as much as you love the other’s children, you fell in love with your partner. Because of this, two families are now joining. You are here because you feel with each other; you have achieved such a harmony and rapport that indeed your souls have touched and become one. St. Paul describes it as a “knitting” of hearts together into one, a metaphor which stresses the interwoven character of the life you will now share. In Emily Bronte’s Wuthering Heights, Cathy refers to this type of oneness. Speaking of Heathcliff, she says: “He is more me than I am.”

In a 17th

Today, two families are brought together, “blended” as it were. But without the “blend” of your own souls, no other “blending” matters. To blend is to “mix together so thoroughly that the things mixed cannot be distinguished or separated.” But I’ve got news for you: Although this beautiful ceremony brings you two together, the marriage itself will accomplish the blending. When you put two liquids together in a cup, do they automatically “blend”? No, they must be stirred together, mixed, beaten, shaken, jiggled, moved around. That is how the two of you will become as one

Declaration of Intention

The minister says: Before God and this congregation, I ask you to affirm your willingness to enter this covenant of marriage and to share all the joys and sorrows of this new relationship, whatever the future may hold.

Addressing the groom: N., will you have N. to be your wife, and will you love her faithfully as long as you both shall live?

The groom responds: I will with the help of God.

Addressing the bride: N., will you have N. to be your husband, and will you love him faithfully as long as you both shall live?

The bride responde: I will with the help of God.

The Marriage Vows

The minister says to the groom: N., will you now affirm your vow before God and these friends by repeating after me?

I, N., take you, N., to be my wife,

And in so doing, I give my life to you,

And all that life entails,

To take the good with the bad,

To live with you through hardship and triumph,

To live with you in the commitment of faith,

The security of hope,

And the joy of love,

Always and forever.

The minister says to the bride: N., will you now affirm your vow before God and these friends by repeating after me?

I, N., take you, N., as my husband.

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I pledge to share my life openly with you, to speak the truth to you in love;

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I promise to honor and tenderly care for you,

To cherish and encourage your own fulfillment

Through all the changes of our lives,

Always and forever.

To this I pledge my solemn vow before God.

Pledge of Support from the Children

The minister now identifies both the bride’s and the groom’s children. The minister then says: I would like to ask you a question about your support for this marriage. Do you give your enthusiastic blessing to N. and N. as they are joined in marriage, and do you promise to do everything in your power to support them in their new life? The children respond: We do.

This question can be put to the children more informally in the following manner: Will you give your enthusiastic support to this marriage in every way you know how, like helping out, and saying I love you once in a while, or with hugs and kisses and thank yous? If you can promise to do these things, please say “We will,” or give me a big “Yeessss!”The children respond.

Depending upon the comfort level of both the minister and the children, this ritual could also proceed: The minister says: If you think this marriage is the greatest thing to happen to your mom or to your dad, then please give me a high

The Exchange of Rings

The minister says: May I have the rings? The minister takes them from the best man or maid or matron of honor, or both, or unties them from the ring bearer’s pillow. Holding the rings high, the minister says: These rings are an outward and visible sign of an inward and invisible grace which unites two hearts in love, and they are especially significant because the circle of these rings is a symbol of the unending and enduring quality of the love which N. and N. are sharing today.

The bride places the ring on the fourth finger of the groom’s left hand and repeats these words after the minister: N., I give you this ring as a sign of my love and faithfulness.

The minister says: Let us pray: Bless, O God, the giving of this ring; may she who gives it and he who wears it live in love and fidelity, and continue in your service all the days of their lives, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

The groom places the ring on the fourth finger of the bride’s left hand and repeats these words after the minister: N., I give you this ring as a sign of my love and faithfulness.

The minister says: Let us pray. Bless, O God, the giving of this ring, that he who gives it and she who wears it live in love and fidelity, and continue in your service all the days of their lives, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Readings

One or all of the following readings may be read by one or more of the children, or a designated person.

A bell is not a bell unless you ring it;

And a song is not a song unless you sing it;

And love isn’t love in your heart to stay,

For love isn’t love, unless you give it away.

Hold fast to dreams,

For if dreams die

Life is a broken

That cannot fly.

Hold fast to dreams,

For if dreams go

Life is a barren field

Frozen with snow.

To laugh often and much;

To win respect of intelligent people and the affection of children;

To earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false friends;

To appreciate beauty;

To find the best in others, to leave the world a bit better, whether by a healthy child, a garden

patch, or a redeemed social condition;

To know even one life has breathed easier because you lived.

This is to have succeeded.

The Unity Candle

The minister says: The lighting of the Unity Candle symbolizes how two lights already burning brightly are blended together in one brilliant light. This is especially significant today because it not only signifies the oneness of these two lives joined into marriage, but of the two families joining into a bright, indistinguishable light.

The children may help light the two candles. The bride and the groom then light the Unity Candle together.

Declaration of Marriage

The children and the bride and groom may stay together at the altar as the minister makes the Declaration of Marriage: Inasmuch as you have agreed to become husband and wife, and have before God and these friend expressed your solemn vows, and have signified the same in the giving of rings and the lighting of this candle, by virtue of the authority vested in me as a minister of the gospel, I declare you to be husband and wife, united in a holy marriage. Those whom God has joined together, let no one put asunder.

Benediction

The minister says: Go with the peace of God and the joy of the Holy Spirit. And may you help each other as you achieve, share with each other what you experience, support each other in what you try, encourage each other in what you attempt, understand each other in what you dream, love each other in all that you are and hope to be. Amen.

Group Hug

The minister says to the groom: N., you may kiss the bride. The minister tells the children: Kids, you may now enjoy a group hug.

Introduction of the Married Couple

The minister says: I am pleased to introduce Mr. and Mrs. N., or, N. and N. N. This might also appropriately be announced by one of the children.

Recessional

Allegro from “Eine Kleine Nachtmusick” (W.A. Mozart)

9. For Widows and Widowers

Order of Service

Processional

Invocation

Welcome and Greeting

Scripture Reading

Homily

Vows

Exchange of Rings

The Wedding Prayer

The Declaration of Marriage

Benediction

Embrace and Kiss

Introduction of the Couple

Recessional

The Ceremony

Processional

Overture from “Musick for the Royal Fireworks” (G.F. Handel)

The service for an older couple is usually smaller and less formal than for other weddings. Often, the wedding occurs in a home. Instead of a traditional processional, the minister may announce the gathering, and the ceremony begins. In a church, the bride and groom may wish to enter the sanctuary together, or the bride may be escorted down the aisle by one or more of her children.

Invocation

The minister says: Heavenly Father, we thank you for your presence in this place and for these your servants who come before you to be united in the bonds of marriage. We thank you that they have found each other to enjoy the benefits of companionship and to experience the thrill of love. We praise you for the gift of your Son Jesus Christ to be our Savior. As we gather in this place, we remember his love for us. We also remember that as he has loved us, we are also called to love one another. Let this kind of sacrificial love be the enduring quality of the love which N. and N. share as they begin life together as husband and wife. In the name of Jesus, we pray. Amen.

Welcome and Greeting

The minister says: On behalf of N. and N., I welcome you to this joyous occasion. That you are here is an expression of your friendship and support as this couple begins a new and exciting chapter in their lives. You are never too old for love, and love is what keeps you young at heart. N. and N. are two of the youngest people I’ve met! Therefore, with pleasure, I welcome you to these holy moments.

Scripture Reading

The minister says: Listen for the word of God in Romans 12:1

Let love be genuine; hate what is evil, hold fast to what is good; love one another with mutual affection; outdo one another in showing honor. Do not lag in zeal, be ardent in spirit, serve the Lord. Rejoice in hope, be patient in suffering, persevere in prayer. Contribute to the needs of the saints; extend hospitality to strangers.

Bless those who persecute you; bless and do not curse them. Rejoice with those who rejoice, weep with those who weep. Live in harmony with one another; do not be haughty, but associate with the lowly; do not claim to be wiser than you are. Do not repay anyone evil for evil, but take thought for what is noble in the sight of all. If it is possible, so far as it depends on you, live peaceably with all.

Homily

The minister says: I am the resurrection and the life.

Not so very long ago, you couldn’t imagine standing here before God and these loved ones. At one time, joy seemed like something forever lost to you. But gradually you began to heal, until you were again able to laugh, to love, to make plans, to hope. Now God, who is able to do far more than all we can ask or think, has given you a precious companion to share your life.

“I am the resurrection and the life.” That’s how Jesus describes the unquenchable vitality of the gift he brings. You each have been through your own Good Friday experiences. But now it is like Easter for you. God has turned your mourning into dancing (Psalm 30:11). The sheer delight you take in each other speaks of God’s love and grace working to resurrect hope and joy in your lives.

You know better than I that the future will be different from the past, in ways that both please and displease you. All newlyweds face the challenge of adjusting to many changes all at once, some expected and others that will surprise you. You each are joining new families with cherished traditions and expectations. Therein is the potential for the doubling of joy, as well as perhaps a little stress:

“We’ve never opened presents on Christmas Eve! I want Christmas morning!”

“But you always come here for Easter.”

If they have a hard time learning to share you, it’s only because they love you so much. But equipped with glad and generous hearts, as your families are, everyone will soon adjust. As you know, life is too short to fuss over the small stuff.

This is your turn, time to give yourselves to each other, time to do the volunteer work that serves God and satisfies your productivity need, as well as time to enjoy the families you now share. With all of them, I wish you health and happiness in this new chapter of your lives.

Vows

The minister says to the groom: N., will you please repeat after me:

N., we have come together late in our lives.

I wish it could have been earlier, much earlier.

But today, as I become your husband,

I give thanks to God for bringing us together.

And I promise to make up for lost time

by loving you with all my heart and soul.

I promise to not sweat the small stuff,

to not be set in my ways,

to get out of my ruts,

to live life earnestly and passionately.

I promise, as your husband,

to be your friend and companion

for all of our days.

The minister says to the bride: N., will you please repeat after me:

N., we have come together late in our lives.

I wish it could have been earlier, much earlier.

But today, as I become your wife,

I give thanks to God for bringing us together.

And I promise to make up for lost time

by loving you with all my heart and soul.

I promise to not sweat the small stuff,

to not be set in my ways,

to get out of my ruts,

to live life earnestly and passionately.

I promise, as your wife,

to be your friend and companion

for all of our days.

Exchange of Rings

The minister, taking the rings, says: These rings are an outward and visible sign of an inward and invisible grace which unites two hearts in love. They are especially significant because the circle of these rings is a symbol of the unending and enduring quality of the love which N. and N. share today.

The bride places the ring on the fourth finger of the groom’s left hand and repeats these words after the minister: N., I give you this ring as a sign of my love and faithfulness.

The groom places the ring on the fourth finger of the bride’s left hand and repeats these words after the minister: N., I give you this ring as a sign of my love and faithfulness.

The minister says: Let us pray. Bless, O God, the giving of these rings, that they who give them and they who wear them may live in love and fidelity, and continue in your service all the days of their lives, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

The Wedding Prayer

The minister says: God of love, shower your grace upon N. and N., who come to you and pledge themselves to live together in holy marriage. Give them wisdom and devotion in ordering their common life, that each may be to the other a strength in need, a counselor in perplexity, a comfort in sorrow and a companion in joy. When selfishness shows itself, grant generosity. When mistrust is a temptation, give patience and gentleness. When suffering becomes their lot, give them a strong faith and abiding hope. Give to them such fulfillment of their mutual affection that their marriage will be an example and an inspiration to us all. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

The Declaration of Marriage

The minister says: N. and N., inasmuch as you have come to this place to be joined in holy matrimony, and have expressed your love and commitment for each in your vows and the giving of rings, by virtue of the authority vested in me as a minister of the gospel, I declare you to be husband and wife, united in the pure and holy bonds of wedlock.

Benediction

The minister continues: May you grow together, enriching your lives with the friendship you have formed. May you grow together, enriching the world with the love you now share. Amen.

Embrace and Kiss

The minister says to the groom: You may kiss the bride. They embrace and kiss.

Introduction of the Couple

The minister says: I am greatly pleased to introduce for the first time Mr. and Mrs. N., or N. and N. N.

Recessional

“Toccata” (Dubois)

Music

A Few of the Most Useful Publications for the Wedding Organist

Title Composer Publisher

Classical Organ Selections Ed., Diane Bush Gentry

Favorite Organ Selections Ed., Diane Bush Gentry

Handel’s Water Musick Arr. for piano by Granville Bantock Paxton

The Biggs Book of Organ Music Ed., E. Power Biggs H.W. Gray

The Diane Bush Wedding Book Ed., Diane Bush Gentry

The Oxford Book of Wedding Music Oxford

The Oxford Book of Wedding Music

for Manuals Oxford

Processionals

Title Composer Publisher

Air in F Major from “Water Music” G. F. Handel Gentry

Bridal Chorus from “Lohengrin” Richard Wagner Gentry

Celebrated Canon in D Johann Pachelbel Gentry

Grand March from “Aida” G. Verdi, arr. B. Hesford Fentone

“Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring”

(from Cantata No. 147) J.S. Bach H.W. Gray

Overture from “Musick for the

Royal Fireworks” G.F. Handel Belwin

Prelude from the “Te Deum” M. Charpentier Oxford

Processional (Trumpet Tune in C) Henry Purcell Oxford

Rigaudon Campra Gentry

Rondeau J.J. Mouret H.W. Gray

“The Rejoicing” (“La Rejouissance”)

from “Musick for the Royal Fireworks” G. F. Handel Belwin

Trumpet Tune in D Henry Purcell Gentry

Trumpet Voluntary in D John Stanley Gentry

Trumpet Voluntary in D

(“Prince of Denmark March”) Jeremiah Clarke Gentry

Wedding Processional from

“The Sound of Music” Rodgers and Hammerstein Presser

Recessionals

Title Composer Publisher

Allegro from “Eine Kleine Nachtmusick”

(“A Little Night Music”) W. A. Mozart, arr. Henri Classen Ed. Combre

Allegro Moderato in D from

“Water Music” G.F. Handel Gentry

Allegro Maestoso (a.k.a. “Hompipe”)

from “Water Music” G.F. Handel Gentry

“Arrival of the Queen of Sheba” from

“Solomon” G.F. Handel Oxford

Fanfare Lemmens Gentry

Fanfare (a.k.a. “Pomposo”) from

“Water Music” G.F. Handel Paxton Music

Fantasia on “In Dulci Jubilo”

(Good Christian Men Rejoice) J.S. Bach Bradley

Festal Fanfare from the

Fourth Concerto J.S. Bach Lorenz

“Glory to God in the Highest” G. Pergolesi H. Flammer

“Hallelujah Chorus” from “Messiah” G.F. Handel G. Schirmer

“Joyful, Joyful We Adore Thee”

(“Ode to Joy”) L. van Beethoven Any Hymnal

“Let the Merry Bells Ring ‘Round” G.F. Handel, arr. Whitford Belwin

“Now Thank We All Our God” S. Karg

“O Had I Jubal’s Lyre” G.F. Handel Gentry

Processional in G Major John Stanley Schirmer

Psalm XIX (19) B. Marcello Gentry

Rondeau (Rondo) J.J. Mouret H.W. Gray

“Spring” from “The Four Seasons” A. Vivaldi Oxford

Toccata Ch. Widor Oxford

Toccata Th. Dubios Gentry

Trumpet Allemande A. Holborne Gentry

Trumpet Voluntary John Stanley Gentry

Voluntary in A Major Wm. Shelby Boston

“Wedding March” from “A Midsummer

Night’s Dream” F. Mendelssohn Gentry

NOTE: Many processionals can also be utilized as recessionals, although the converse is not necessarily true. Length and flexibility of the piece, length of the church aisle and number of people in the wedding party dictate less freedom in the choice of a processional.

Prelude Music

Organ

Title Composer Publisher

Adagio Cantabile G. Tartini G. Schirmer

Adagio Cantabile (Violin Sonata #3) J.S. Bach Gentry

Allegro (from Concerto #5) G.F. Handel, arr. Whitford Harold Flammer

Allegro (from Concerto #8) G.F. Handel, arr. Whitford Harold Flammer

Allegretto in F G.F. Handel, ed. Bush Gentry

Arioso in A (Air on the G. String) J.S. Bach

“Ave Maria” Bach

“Ave Maria” Schubert, arr. Diane Bush Gentry

Celebrated Canon in D. J. Pachelbel Gentry

“Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring” J.S. Bach H.W. Gray

March, Slow Tune & Minuet

from “Musick’s Handmaid” Henry Purcell Basil Ramsey

Prelude from “The Fairy Queen” Henry Purcell Basil Ramsey

Rondeau from “Abdelazar” Henry Purcell Basil Ramsey

“Sheep May Safely Graze” J.S. Bach H.W. Gray

“The Faithful Shepherd” G.F. Handel H.W. Gray

“The Married Beau” (Slow Air) Henry Purcell Basil Ramsey

Piano

Title Composer Publisher

Adagio Cantabile from “Sonate

Pathetique,” Opus 13 L. van Beethoven G. Schirmer

Allegro; Romance; Minuet; Rondo W.A. Mozart (transcribed

from “Eine Kliene Nachtmusik” for piano by Henri Classen) Ed. Combre

“Ave Maria” Bach

“Clair De Lune” from “Suite Bergamasque” Claude Debussy C. Fischer

Clarinet Concerto in A, K. 622, W.A. Mozart (transcribed for Hal Leonard

2nd Movement piano from “Out of Africa”)

Nocturne in E Flat F. Chopin G. Schirmer

Rondo, K. 485 W.A. Mozart G. Schirmer

Spring, Winter and Fall from

“The Four Seasons” A. Vivaldi Belwin

Vocal Solos

Title Composer

All I Ask of You* Andrew Lloyd Webber

All I Have Beth Neilson Chapman

And This is My Beloved from “Kismet” G. Forrest

Annie’s Song John Denver

Ave Maria Bach

Ave Maria F. Schubert

Beautiful in My Eyes Joshua Kadison

Butterfly Kisses Carlisle/Thomas

Can You Feel the Love Tonight? Elton John

Doubly Good to You Amy Grant

Endless Love Lionel Ritchie

Entreat Me Not to Leave Thee Ch. Gounod

Evergreen Williams

Everything I Do, I Do it For You Bryan Adams

Grow Old With Me John Lennon

How Beautiful Twila Paris (Cry from the Desert Album)

I Will be Here Steven Curtis Chapman

In This Very Room* Ron and Carol Harris

Longer Dan Fogelberg

Now Roger Nichols

Old Irish Blessing Denes Agay

One Hand, One Heart Leonard Bernstein

Panis Angelicus Cesar Franck

Sabbath Prayer from “Fiddler on the Roof” Harnick

Somewhere Out There* Horner, Mann, Weil

Sunrise, Sunset from “Fiddler on the Roof” Harnick

The Father Says, “I Do” Brent Lamb

The First Time I Loved Forever Lee Holdridge (Beauty & the Beast)

The Gift of Love Arr. Hal Hopson

The Lord’s Prayer Malotte

This is the Day Scott Wesley Brown

Through the Eyes of Love Carole Bayer Sager

Turn Around Harry Belafonte

Wedding Song Paul Stuckey

We’ve Only Just Begun Nichols

When I Fall in Love* Victor Young

Wind Beneath My Wings Gary Morris

Your Song Elton John

Country Western Songs

Title Composer

I Cross My Heart Steve Dorff & E. Kaz

I Swear G. Baker

In This Life Shamblin

Keeper of the Stars Mayo and Lee

Love Can Build a Bridge* The Judds

The Vows Go Unbroken* E. Kaz

To Me* Mike Reid

You and I* Eddie Rabbit

Extremely Old Oldies

Title Composer

Because Guy D’Hardelot

Wedding Prayer Olive Dungan

Hawaiian Wedding Song Charles King

Whither Thou Goest Guy Singer

O Perfect Love J. Barnby

I Love You Truly Carrie Jacobs

O Promise Me de Koven

*Denotes a song which can also be sung as a duet and is available as such

SCRIPTURE READINGS

1. The Old Testament

Genesis 1:26

Genesis 2:18

Ruth 1:16

Psalm 33:1

Psalm 37:3

Psalm 67

Psalm 100

Psalm 103

Psalm 121

Psalm 127

Psalm 128

Psalm 150

Song of Solomon 2:8

Song of Solomon 8:6

2. The New Testament

Matthew 19:4

John 15:9

Romans 8:31

Romans 12:1

1 Corinthians 13

Ephesians 3:14

Ephesians 5:2, 21

Colossians 3:12

1 Peter 3:1

1 John 3:18

1 John 4:7

OTHER READINGS

3. Vedic Literature

We have taken the seven steps. You have become mine forever. Yes, we have become partners. I have become yours. Hereafter, I cannot live without you. Do not live without me. Let us share the joys. We are word and meaning, united. You are thought, and I am sound.

May the nights be honey

May the plants be honey

As the heavens are stable, as the earth is stable, as the mountains are stable, as the whole universe is stable, so may our union be permanently settled.

7.

Hold fast to dreams,

For if dreams die

Life is a broken

That cannot fly.

Hold fast to dreams,

For if dreams go

Life is a barren field

Frozen with snow.

Langston Hughes

8.

To laugh often and much;

To win the respect of intelligent people and the affection of children;

To earn the appreciation of honest critics and endure the betrayal of false

friends;

To appreciate beauty;

To find the best in others, to leave the world a bit better, whether by a

healthy child, a garden patch, or a redeemed social condition;

To know even one life has breathed easier because you lived.

This is to have succeeded.

9.

Happiness can’t be found in any specific place. It isn’t something you can capture and put in a jar like a butterfly. It’s a state of mind that flows like water and shifts like the sands. The happiest people I know are too busy to ask themselves if they are happy.

Unknown

10.

Love alone is capable of uniting living beings in such a way as to complete and fulfill them, for it alone takes them and joins them by what is deepest in themselves.

11.

Love is friendship that has caught fire. It is quiet understanding, mutual confidence, sharing and forgiving. It is loyalty through good and bad times. It settles for less than perfection and makes allowances for human weaknesses.

Love is content with the present, it hopes for the future, and it doesn’t brood over the past. It’s the day

If you have love in your life, it can make up for a great many things you lack. If you don’t have it, no matter what else there is, it’s not enough.

Order of Service

Processional

Invocation

Welcome and Greeting

Release of the Bride to the Groom

Reading from Scripture

Homily

Declaration of Intention

The Marriage Vows

Pledge of Support from the Children

The Exchange of Rings

Readings

The Unity Candle

Declaration of Marriage

Benediction

Group Hug

Introduction of the Married Couple

Recessional

The Ceremony

Ruth 1:16 1662 Book of Common Prayer-in and day-out chronicle of irritations, problems, compromises, small disappointments, big victories and working toward common goals.-First Reading-giving, all-conquering love. We pray in the Savior’s name. Amen. -First Reading:-17– there will I be buried.– Second Reading: Colossians 3:12-17– the Gospel: John 15:9-17– gathered to witness the joining together of N. and N. as husband and wife. Also present, however, is God’s Spirit, just as God, through Jesus Christ, was present at another wedding a long time ago in Cana of Galilee. Thus, with all of you here as friends and family, these are happy moments; and with God among us these are holy moments. Thus, we gather in this holy, happy place — or happy, holy place — to witness this marriage.– John 15:9-17.-century sonnet written in praise of her marriage, Anne Bradstreet says to her husband: “If ever two were one, then surely we.” — not by a mere pronouncement, but in the moving and shaking of your life together — in those ecstatic moments of joy and happiness, in those irritating interruptions, in the emergencies, the small joys and big challenges. Those are the occurrences of your shared life which will inevitably and eventually bring to you a beautiful “blend” in which you both shall be so much at one with each other that the ingredients mixed cannot be distinguished or separated. This is my prayer for you. Amen.-five. The minister goes to each child and exchanges high-fives.– Source Unknown-winged bird– Langston Hughes– Ralph Waldo Emerson (also attributed to Harry Emerson Fosdick)-2, 9-18: I appeal to you therefore, brothers and sisters, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God, which is your spiritual worship. Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your minds, so that you may discern what is the will of God — what is good and acceptable and perfect. -Elert Gentry-Gounod, arr. Joyce Jones Bradley Pub.-Gounod Belwin-Gounod-Bond-28, 31-24-17-5-7-13-7-6-17-39-2, 9-18-21-33-17-9-24-16-sweet for us; may the mornings be honey-sweet for us; may the earth be honey-sweet for us; may the heavens be honey-sweet for us.-sweet for us; may the sun be all honey for us; may the cows yield us honey-sweet milk!-winged bird– Ralph Waldo Emerson (also attributed to Harry Emerson Fosdick)– Teilhard De Chardin-in and day-out chronicle of irritations, problems, compromises, small disappointments, big victories, and working toward common goals.

12.

Let there be spaces in your togetherness,

and let the winds of the heavens dance between you.

Love one another, but make not a bond of love.

Let it rather be a moving sea between the shores of your souls.

Fill each other’s cup, but drink not from one cup.

Give one another of your bread, but eat not from the same loaf.

Sing and dance together and be joyous, but let each one of you be alone,

Even as the strings of a lute are alone though they quiver with the same music.

Give your hearts, but not into each other’s keeping.

For only the hand of Life can contain your hearts.

And stand together yet not too near together.

For the pillars of the temple stand apart,

And the oak tree and cypress grow not in each other’s shadow.

13.

I add my breath to your breath

That our days may be long on the Earth

That the days of our people may be long

That we may be one person

That we may finish our roads together

May our mother bless you with Life

May our Life Paths be fulfilled.

Unknown– Kahlil Gibran, The Prophet

14.

What greater thing is there for two human souls than to feel that they are joined for life

15.

You are my beloved, I will always cherish you.

You are my beloved, I see your great beauty.

You are my beloved, I feel your great power.

You are my beloved, I respect your great wisdom.

You are my beloved, my home is with you.

You are my beloved, I value your independence.

You are my beloved, I am radiant in your love.

I will always love you.

I will always love you.

I will always love you.

I will always love you.

Song from the Keres Indians– to strengthen each other in all labor, to rest on each other in all sorrow, to minister to each other in all pain, to be one with each other in silent, unspeakable memories at the moment of the last parting.– George Eliot

16.

Love is a great thing, a great and thorough good; by itself it makes everything that is heavy light; and it bears evenly all that is uneven.

It carries a burden which is no burden; it will not be kept back by anything low and mean; it desires to be free from all worldly affections, and not to be entangled by any outward prosperity, or by any adversity subdued.

Love feels no burden, thinks nothing of trouble, attempts what is above its strength, pleads no excuse of impossibility.

It is therefore able to undertake all things, and it completes many things, and warrants them to take effect, where he who does not love would faint and lie down.

Though weary, it is not tired; though pressed, it is not straitened; though alarmed, it is not confounded; but as a living flame it forces its way upward, and securely passes through all.

Love is active and sincere; courageous, patient, faithful, and prudent.

17.

The first duty of love is to listen.

Native American tradition– Thomas ˆ Kempis

18.

No partnership can be as close as that which two who care will form the day they vow to love, to honor, and to share.

From that day on, their hearts will find as one year meets another that nothing can affect the one and not affect the other.

All trials and problems, all cares and woes

And happily, life’s nicest things bestowed in ample measure will hold a double share of joy, fond memories and pleasure as time goes by

Unknown

19.

When love beckons to you, follow him, though his ways are hard and sometimes steep.

And when his wings enfold you, yield to him, And when he speaks to you, believe in him.

And he shall ascend to your height and caress your tenderest branches that quiver in the sun.

Love gives naught but itself and takes naught from itself.

Love possesses not nor would it be possessed;

For love is sufficient unto love.

When you love, you should not say, “God is in my heart” but rather, “I am in the heart of God.”

And think not that you can direct the course of love, for love, if it finds you worthy, directs your course.

Love has no other desire but to fulfill itself.

But if you love and must have desires, let these be your desires:

To melt and be like a running brook that sings its melody to the night.

To know the pain of too much tenderness.

To be wounded by your own understanding of love;

And to bleed willingly and joyfully.

To wake at dawn with a winged heart and give thanks for another day of loving;

To return home at eventide with gratitude;

And then to sleep with a prayer for the beloved in your heart and a song of praise upon your lips.

Paul Tillich– each bout of stormy weather are visited not just on one — but on two who stand together. — new bonds will grow, new dreams will come true — and looking back, you will see that your love has brought reality to all you’ve hoped and planned, because nothing is impossible when love goes hand in hand.

20.

A relationship has to be more than words. It has to share pleasure in new ideas. It has to draw upon differences to become closer. It has to care when the other person is hurting. It has to touch when words just aren’t enough. It has to accept that the other person sometimes needs time to be alone. It has to build a solid foundation toward future love and happiness. But most important, a relationship needs trust.

Kahlil Gibran, The Prophet– Unknown

The New Testament reading is from Ephesians 5:2, 21

Wives, be subject to your husbands as you are to the Lord. For the husband is the head of the wife just as Christ is the head of the church, the body of which he is the Savior. Just as the church is subject to Christ, so also wives ought to be, in everything, to their husbands.

Husbands, love your wives, just as Christ loved the church and gave himself up for her …. In the same way, husbands should love their wives as they do their own bodies. He who loves his wife loves himself ….

For this reason a man will leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two will become one flesh. This is a great mystery, and I am applying it to Christ and the church. Each of you, however, should love his wife as himself, and a wife should respect her husband.

Minister’s Remarks (Homily)

The minister chooses a homily from those in Chapter 10, prepares his or her own remarks, or says: Many words come to mind today: Love. Togetherness. Bride. Groom. Plans. Frustration! But another word is “gift.”

No doubt many of your friends have blessed you not only with their presence, but also with tangible expressions of their love and friendship. You will receive them gratefully, and you will spend hours writing thank

But other gifts are present here today. One is the gift of marriage, which comes from God. Marriage is God’s idea, for God saw that in the fidelity of marriage, and the companionship of marriage, lay an opportunity for incredible happiness. When you are experiencing the joy of your marriage, you can give God the praise. When you are experiencing the growth pains of the marriage, you can remember that God has given you to each other as a gift.

But other gifts still exist. Today, N., N. gives you the gift of herself. All that she is and hopes to be, she gives now to you. What more precious gift can there be? She believes that she can better be who she is intended to be with you than without you. She holds her heart in her hand, and extends it to you, knowing you will take care of her. And, N., N. likewise gives himself to you as a gift. Sometimes it is not easy for a man to give himself to anyone. But in you, he has found someone with whom he can trust his heart, his life, his goals, his dreams.

Now, you can give to each other one more thing: time. Give each other: time to grow, time to share, time to experience, time to make mistakes, time to love.

You will truly enjoy God’s gift of marriage when you give each other the gift of self and the gift of time. Amen.

Declaration of Intention

The minister says: Before God and this congregation, I ask you to affirm your willingness to enter this covenant of marriage and to share all the joys and sorrows of this new relationship, whatever the future may hold.

Addressing the groom: N., will you have N. to be your wife, and will you love her faithfully as long as you both shall live?

The groom says: I will, with the help of God.

Addressing the bride: N., will you have N. to be your husband, and will you love him faithfully as long as you both shall live?

The bride says: I will, with the help of God.

Vows

The minister says (addressing the groom): N., do you have this woman to be your wedded wife, to live together after God’s ordinance in the holy estate of matrimony, to have and to hold from this day forward, for better and for worse, for richer and for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, and, forsaking all others, keep only unto her so long as you both shall live?

Groom responds: I do.

The minister says (addressing the bride): N., do you have this man to be your wedded husband, to live together after God’s ordinance in the holy estate of matrimony, to have and to hold from this day forward, for better and for worse, for richer and for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, and, forsaking all others, keep only unto him so long as you both shall live?

Bride responds: I do.

Song

A vocalist sings: “The Gift of Love” (Hopson), or a version of “The Lord’s Prayer.”

Exchange of Rings

The minister says: May I have the rings? The minister takes them from the best man or maid or matron of honor, or both, or unties them from the ring bearer’s pillow. Holding the rings aloft, the minister says: These rings are an outward and visible sign of an inward and invisible grace, which unites two hearts in love. They are especially significant because the circle of these rings is a symbol of the unending and enduring quality of the love which N. and N. are sharing today.

The bride places the ring on the fourth finger of the groom’s left hand and repeats these words after the minister: With this ring I thee wed, and with my body I thee honor, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

The minister says: Let us pray: Bless, O God, the giving of this ring. May she who gives it and he who wears it live in love and fidelity, and continue in your service all the days of their lives, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

The groom places the ring on the fourth finger of the bride’s left hand and repeats these words after the minister: With this ring I thee wed, and with my body I thee honor, and with all my worldly goods I thee endow; in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.

Wedding Music

WEDDING MUSIC

A Few of the Most Useful Publications for the Wedding Organist

Title Composer Publisher

Classical Organ Selections Ed., Diane Bish Gentry

Favorite Organ Selections Ed., Diane Bish Gentry

Handel’s Water Musick Arr. for piano by Granville Bantock Paxton

The Biggs Book of Organ Music Ed., E. Power Biggs H.W. Gray

The Diane Bush Wedding Book Ed., Diane Bush Gentry

The Oxford Book of Wedding Music Oxford

The Oxford Book of Wedding Music

for Manuals Oxford

Processionals

Title Composer Publisher

Air in F Major from “Water Music” G. F. Handel Gentry

Bridal Chorus from “Lohengrin” Richard Wagner Gentry

Celebrated Canon in D Johann Pachelbel Gentry

Grand March from “Aida” G. Verdi, arr. B. Hesford Fentone

“Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring”

(from Cantata No. 147) J.S. Bach H.W. Gray

Overture from “Musick for the

Royal Fireworks” G.F. Handel Belwin

Prelude from the “Te Deum” M. Charpentier Oxford

Processional (Trumpet Tune in C) Henry Purcell Oxford

Rigaudon Campra Gentry

Rondeau J.J. Mouret H.W. Gray

“The Rejoicing” (“La Rejouissance”)

from “Musick for the Royal Fireworks” G. F. Handel Belwin

Trumpet Tune in D Henry Purcell Gentry

Trumpet Voluntary in D John Stanley Gentry

Trumpet Voluntary in D

(“Prince of Denmark March”) Jeremiah Clarke Gentry

Wedding Processional from

“The Sound of Music” Rodgers and Hammerstein Presser

Recessionals

Title Composer Publisher

Allegro from “Eine Kleine Nachtmusick”

(“A Little Night Music”) W. A. Mozart, arr. Henri Classen Ed. Combre

Allegro Moderato in D from

“Water Music” G.F. Handel Gentry

Allegro Maestoso (a.k.a. “Hompipe”)

from “Water Music” G.F. Handel Gentry

“Arrival of the Queen of Sheba” from

“Solomon” G.F. Handel Oxford

Fanfare Lemmens Gentry

Fanfare (a.k.a. “Pomposo”) from

“Water Music” G.F. Handel Paxton Music

Fantasia on “In Dulci Jubilo”

(Good Christian Men Rejoice) J.S. Bach Bradley

Festal Fanfare from the

Fourth Concerto J.S. Bach Lorenz

“Glory to God in the Highest” G. Pergolesi H. Flammer

“Hallelujah Chorus” from “Messiah” G.F. Handel G. Schirmer

“Joyful, Joyful We Adore Thee”

(“Ode to Joy”) L. van Beethoven Any Hymnal

“Let the Merry Bells Ring ‘Round” G.F. Handel, arr. Whitford Belwin

“Now Thank We All Our God” S. Karg-Elert Gentry

“O Had I Jubal’s Lyre” G.F. Handel Gentry

Processional in G Major John Stanley Schirmer

Psalm XIX (19) B. Marcello Gentry

Rondeau (Rondo) J.J. Mouret H.W. Gray

“Spring” from “The Four Seasons” A. Vivaldi Oxford

Toccata Ch. Widor Oxford

Toccata Th. Dubios Gentry

Trumpet Allemande A. Holborne Gentry

Trumpet Voluntary John Stanley Gentry

Voluntary in A Major Wm. Shelby Boston

“Wedding March” from “A Midsummer

Night’s Dream” F. Mendelssohn Gentry

NOTE: Many processionals can also be utilized as recessionals, although the converse is not necessarily true. Length and flexibility of the piece, length of the church aisle and number of people in the wedding party dictate less freedom in the choice of a processional.

Prelude Music – Organ

Title Composer Publisher

Adagio Cantabile G. Tartini G. Schirmer

Adagio Cantabile (Violin Sonata #3) J.S. Bach Gentry

Allegro (from Concerto #5) G.F. Handel, arr. Whitford Harold Flammer

Allegro (from Concerto #8) G.F. Handel, arr. Whitford Harold Flammer

Allegretto in F G.F. Handel, ed. Bush Gentry

Arioso in A (Air on the G. String) J.S. Bach

“Ave Maria” Bach-Gounod, arr. Joyce Jones Bradley Pub.

“Ave Maria” Schubert, arr. Diane Bush Gentry

Celebrated Canon in D. J. Pachelbel Gentry

“Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring” J.S. Bach H.W. Gray

March, Slow Tune & Minuet

from “Musick’s Handmaid” Henry Purcell Basil Ramsey

Prelude from “The Fairy Queen” Henry Purcell Basil Ramsey

Rondeau from “Abdelazar” Henry Purcell Basil Ramsey

“Sheep May Safely Graze” J.S. Bach H.W. Gray

“The Faithful Shepherd” G.F. Handel H.W. Gray

“The Married Beau” (Slow Air) Henry Purcell Basil Ramsey

Prelude Music – Piano

Title Composer Publisher

Adagio Cantabile from “Sonate

Pathetique,” Opus 13 L. van Beethoven G. Schirmer

Allegro; Romance; Minuet; Rondo W.A. Mozart (transcribed

from “Eine Kliene Nachtmusik” for piano by Henri Classen) Ed. Combre

“Ave Maria” Bach-Gounod Belwin

“Clair De Lune” from “Suite Bergamasque” Claude Debussy C. Fischer

Clarinet Concerto in A, K. 622, W.A. Mozart (transcribed for Hal Leonard

2nd Movement piano from “Out of Africa”)

Nocturne in E Flat F. Chopin G. Schirmer

Rondo, K. 485 W.A. Mozart G. Schirmer

Spring, Winter and Fall from

“The Four Seasons” A. Vivaldi Belwin

Vocal Solos

Title Composer

All I Ask of You* Andrew Lloyd Webber

All I Have Beth Neilson Chapman

And This is My Beloved from “Kismet” G. Forrest

Annie’s Song John Denver

Ave Maria Bach-Gounod

Ave Maria F. Schubert

Beautiful in My Eyes Joshua Kadison

Butterfly Kisses Carlisle/Thomas

Can You Feel the Love Tonight? Elton John

Doubly Good to You Amy Grant

Endless Love Lionel Ritchie

Entreat Me Not to Leave Thee Ch. Gounod

Evergreen Williams

Everything I Do, I Do it For You Bryan Adams

Grow Old With Me John Lennon

How Beautiful Twila Paris (Cry from the Desert Album)

I Will be Here Steven Curtis Chapman

In This Very Room* Ron and Carol Harris

Longer Dan Fogelberg

Now Roger Nichols

Old Irish Blessing Denes Agay

One Hand, One Heart Leonard Bernstein

Panis Angelicus Cesar Franck

Sabbath Prayer from “Fiddler on the Roof” Harnick

Somewhere Out There* Horner, Mann, Weil

Sunrise, Sunset from “Fiddler on the Roof” Harnick

The Father Says, “I Do” Brent Lamb

The First Time I Loved Forever Lee Holdridge (Beauty & the Beast)

The Gift of Love Arr. Hal Hopson

The Lord’s Prayer Malotte

This is the Day Scott Wesley Brown

Through the Eyes of Love Carole Bayer Sager

Turn Around Harry Belafonte

Wedding Song Paul Stuckey

We’ve Only Just Begun Nichols

When I Fall in Love* Victor Young

Wind Beneath My Wings Gary Morris

Your Song Elton John

Country Western Songs

Title Composer

I Cross My Heart Steve Dorff & E. Kaz

I Swear G. Baker

In This Life Shamblin

Keeper of the Stars Mayo and Lee

Love Can Build a Bridge* The Judds

The Vows Go Unbroken* E. Kaz

To Me* Mike Reid

You and I* Eddie Rabbit

Extremely Old Oldies

Title Composer

Because Guy D’Hardelot

Wedding Prayer Olive Dungan

Hawaiian Wedding Song Charles King

Whither Thou Goest Guy Singer

O Perfect Love J. Barnby

I Love You Truly Carrie Jacobs-Bond

O Promise Me de Koven

*Denotes a song which can also be sung as a duet and is available as such